The Goat, The Goat’s Horn, and The Bezoar (Symbolism and Mythology)

By Joseph “Joe” Panek | A Seeker’s Thoughts

The Goat, along with the Goat’s Horn, provides us with an abundance of Symbolism and Mythology. The Goat is also a Metaphor which expresses itself in our daily lives.

The Goat is a sure-footed animal that is as much at home on mountain slopes and mountain tops as it is on flat ground. In this aspect, the Goat is a Symbol of agility. And, in its ability to scale a mountain, it is a Symbol of determination.

The male Goat, because of its reproductive prowess, is a Symbol of virility, vitality, potency, and stamina.  It therefore represents the energy of the creative and regenerative Seed: traits which are expressed in the Mythology and Symbolism of the Greek Goat God Pan. Pan is the forest Deity that is the creative and regenerative spirit for all the plant and animal life which inhabit His domain.

The famale Goat is a Symbol of nurturing and nourishment.

The she-Goat Amalthea is the nurturing Goddess who was the wet-nurse, or nursemaid, of the Greek God Zeus. From the she-Goat we also get the Word, Nanny: a term we use today for the person we charge and entrust with caring for our infants and young children in our absence.

The milk of the female Goat is a sustenance fed to infants. Its high quality and nourishment is a Compatible substitute for mother’s milk and for formulas which may not be agreeable to infants.

The Horn of the Goat, both male and female, is both Symbolic and practical.

It is the Horn of the she-Goat Amalthea, the wet-nurse of Zeus, which is the Symbolic Cornucopia: the Horn of Plenty, the Horn of perpetual abundance.

The Horn was also used as a drinking vessel in antiquity and is a dual Symbol in that it is both masculine and feminine.

When pointed upwards, the Horn is the masculine, penetrating, and assertive, phallic Symbol. When pointed downwards, it is the feminine, receptive cup or chalice (womb).

This dual Symbolism, therefore, is representative of the yin/yang energy. And the the combination of both the upturned Horn along with the downturned Horn carries the same sacred Symbolism and Esoteric meaning as the six-pointed “Star of David”.

Those of us who are Harry Potter fans are familiar with the Bezoar. A Bezoar is a stone which grows in the stomach of animals. Bezoars removed from a Goat were considered the most potent and were ground up and used as elixirs and antidotes for poisoning.

Bezoars were sought because they were believed to have the power of a universal antidote against any poison. It was believed that a drinking glass which contained a Bezoar would neutralize any poison poured into it. The word “bezoar” comes from the Persian pâdzahr (پادزهر), which literally means “protection from poison.” (from: Wikipedia.com)

As we can see, the Goat is not only a Symbolic and Mythological creature, it is also an animal which provides practical and nutritional benefits to mankind. And it is easy to understand why this animal was so honored and cherished by ancient cultures throughout the world.

2 comments

  1. Very interesting. For the last three years I have lived on a goat farm, and what you say is very true. Our goat milk has been used as a substitute for mothers milk for humans, cats dogs, cows and even a Clydesdale. Our best milkers produce literally a ton of milk a year, no wonder a goat can make a big difference to a village in Africa or the Middle East. One other reason I think goats have been seen as magical is that they are so expressive and have such individual personalities. They are almost human like in the way each goat is an individual.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, thanks for the comment. Keep in mind I didn’t write this article. I post articles that I have found interesting over the years and learned something from. I’m basically sharing my source of knowledge. Joe Panek’s articles are very informative and I agree with most of his interpretations of occult symbolism.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: